Why would Amazon ban a book called Who Did 9/11?

Dr. Nicholas Kollerstrom, a history of science Ph.D. with a specialty in chemistry, is the author of many books, including:

*The best book on the 7/7 London bombings, Terror on the Tube. (Watch the 7/7 video Kollerstrom and Farrell Are Dead.)

*Breaking the Spell, which builds on Dr. Kollerstrom’s research into cyanide residues discovered in German concentration camps—research that got him summarily fired from University College London.

*Chronicles of False Flag Terror critiquing official versions of the Bologna railway station bombing (August 1980), the Israeli London Embassy bombing (July 1994), four trains detonated in Madrid (March 2004), four explosions in London (July 2005), the Heathrow Airport “terror plot” (August 2006), the Amsterdam Airport Schiphol crotch bomber (December 2009), the Oslo “Breivik” terror attack (July 2011), the London Drummer Lee Rigby (May 2013), the Ukraine MH17 shoot-down (July 2014), Charlie Hebdo (January 2015), Bataclan theater (November 2015), Brussels Airport (March 2016), Nice and Munich (July 2016).

*How Britain Initiated both World Wars —an important contribution to the rising tide of World War II revisionism summarized in Ron Unz’s recent “American Pravda: Understanding World War II.”

*The Dark Side of Isaac Newton: Science’s Greatest Fraud? (Don’t worry, this one won’t be banned any time soon, since Isaac Newton revisionism somehow slips under the censors’ radar.)

The Dark Side of Isaac Newton: Science's Greatest Fraud?

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The Dark Side of Isaac Newton: Science’s Greatest Fraud?

by Nick Kollerstrom Isaac Newton was accorded a semi-divine status in the 18th and 19th centuries, whereby his image linked together religion and science. The real human being behind the demi-god image has tended to be lost. He was a person who took credit from others, and crushed the reputations of those to whom he owed most. This most brilliant of mathematicians could alas be devious, deceptive and duplicitous. This work doesn’t go looking at unpublished alchemical musings as is nowadays fashionable, rather it sticks to the historical record. At the time when the new science was born, we scrutinize the ways in which he failed to discover the law of gravity or invent calculus. What exactly did Leibniz mean by describing him as ‘a mind neither fair nor honest’? Why did Robert Hooke describe him as ‘the veriest knave in all the house’ and why was the astronomer Flamsteed calling him SIN (Sir Isaac Newton)?We are here concerned to give him credit for what he did discover, which may not be quite what you had been told. This book redefines the genius of Isaac Newton, but without the heavily mythologised baggage of a bygone era. He believed in one God, one law and one bank. (less)