PQC: CAUTION! This smells heavily Jewish! In fact this is just a small part of the desperate Jewish second execution of JFK! There are books written years ago on the Kennedies’ private life!

By Cesar Chelala

This story has three protagonists: Marlene Dietrich, the famous German artist and protagonist of the movie The Blue Angel, the ex-American President John F. Kennedy (“Jack”), and Kenneth Tynan, one of the most notable English theater critics of the second half of the 20th century. The details of it are described in the book “Kenneth Tynan’s diaries”.

Marlene Dietrich had become friends with Kenneth Tynan after he described his bisexual nature by saying, in a comment about her: “Her sex has no preferences.” To which Dietrich replied: “There are so many people trying to guess me and only he understood me”. On one occasion, Dietrich told Tynan about her relationship with President Kennedy.

In the decade of the 30s, Dietrich was a friend of Joseph P. Kennedy, the father of the president. Dietrich’s daughter used to be a swimming partner of the sons of Joseph Kennedy, including John F. Kennedy, who would later become President of the United States. In the fall of 1962, Dietrich was acting in a Washington, D.C. night club.

Bob and Ted Kennedy, Joseph’s children, went to see her perform. The president, of course, did not usually go to night clubs. His absence saddened Marlene Dietrich until she received an invitation to the White House to have a drink with the President the following Saturday at 6 o’clock in the afternoon.

That same day, at 7 pm, Dietrich had to be at the Hotel Statler in Washington, D.C., now called Capitol Hilton, to receive a tribute from the Jewish Veterans of World War II for her help to the Jewish refugees during that war. Despite the scheduling conflict that this represented, Dietrich decided to accept Kennedy’s invitation and arrived at the White House at 6 o’clock in the afternoon.

As soon as she arrived, Dietrich was led by the president’s aide-de-camp to her room where a bottle of German white wine awaited her. “The President recalled that when he dined with you in New York, you told him that this was your favorite wine,” the aide-de-camp told her. Then he poured her a glass of wine and discreetly retired.

At 6.15 o’clock Kennedy appeared. The president gave her a kiss on the cheek, took her to the balcony of the room and started talking about Lincoln. “I hope you’re not in a hurry,” the President told him. “Actually, I am,” said the German actress. Then she explained that 2,000 Jewish war veterans were waiting for her at 7:00 in the afternoon to pay her homage.

“Then we do not have much time,” Kennedy said, looking her in the eye. Dietrich told Tynan that she loves the company of powerful men and to hang their scalp in her hunting belt. “No, Jack, I guess not,” Dietrich told him. Kennedy took her glass and led her through a corridor into the presidential bedroom. Then Marlene Dietrich tells:

“I remembered his back problems – a war wound.” She looked at him and Kennedy was already undressing. Rolls of bandage were being taken from his torso. “Now I am an old woman but at that moment I said to myself: I would like to sleep with the President but for nothing in the world I want to be on top of him.”

Apparently, things went well and, a few moments later, Kennedy fell asleep. “Then,” said Marlene Dietrich, “I looked at my watch and it was 6.50 in the afternoon. I got dressed and shook him while saying: Jack, wake up! There are 2,000 people waiting for me. For God’s sake, get me out of here! Then Kennedy took a towel, put it around his waist as his only dress and took me to an elevator. Kennedy told the elevator operator to ask for a car to take me immediately to the Hotel Statler. Meanwhile, Kennedy was standing with just a towel around his waist as if it were the most natural thing in the world. As I entered the elevator he said: ‘There is only one thing I would like to know: Have you ever slept with my father’? “I then answered: No, Jack, I never did.” ‘Well,’ he told me, ‘this is the only time I got there first.’ The elevator door closed and I never saw him again,” concluded Marlene Dietrich.

Whos is César Chelala?

Contributing Editor, The Globalist

[New York, United States]

César Chelala is a global health consultant and contributing editor for The Globalist.

Since 1980, he has worked as a consultant on planning, monitoring and evaluation of public health projects for several international agencies.

He has conducted health-related missions in over 50 countries for USAID, UNICEF, WHO, PAHO, UNFPA, UNDP, UNESCO, Capital Development Fund, the Guttmacher Institute, the Mexican Foundation for Health, World Education, the Pew Charitable Trusts and the Carnegie Corporation.

He earned his medical degree in 1964. In 1971, he came to the United States and worked as a researcher in molecular genetics and pharmacology at New York City’s Public Health Research Institute and later at the New York University School of Medicine.

He has written scientific and medical articles for The Journal of the American Medical Association, Lancet, Molecular and General Genetics, the British Medical Journal and Proceedings of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences.

In 1979, he co-authored an article (with Paul H. Hoeffel) about the “disappeared” in Argentina. The article, “Missing or Dead in Argentina: The Desperate Search for Thousands of Abducted Victims,” was published as a cover story in The New York Times Magazine. The authors received the 1979 Overseas Press Club of America award for the best article on human rights.

He has received two national journalism awards from ADEPA, the organization of newspaper editors in Argentina. In 2015 he received the Chaski award from Taller Latinoamericano, a leading cultural institution in the U.S., and that same year he was awarded the Cedar of Lebanon Gold Medal from The House of Lebanon, in Tucumán, Argentina.

He has written for several newspapers around the world, among them: The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Wall Street Journal, The China Daily, The Daily News Egypt, The Japan Times, The Moscow Times, The News International (Pakistan), Le Monde Diplomatique (France), Asahi Shimbun (Japan), Los Angeles Times, The Miami Herald, The Boston Globe, The San Francisco Chronicle, The Seattle Times, Neue Zücher Zeitung, The Daily Star (Beirut), The Swiss Review of World Affairs and The International Herald Tribune.

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