The-Zionist-Plan-for-the-Middle-EastPQC: Surprised?  While this is a news worthy, but NOTHING NEW. The Jews planned something more evil than just “suffocating” the Palestinian. The Jews have a true final solution, not a hoaxed one that attributes to Hitler, that is literally a complete cleansing of Palestinians. The Jews “great plan”, as we all know, is the Yinon Plan in which the Jews will unleash chaos, destruction, murdering, ethnic cleansing  in Arabs world until they get all the land that the fucking cheating Yahweh had promised his fucking chosen shits before he died!  My guess is, in the long term the opposite will happen. The Arab Muslims used to be smart and wise.  Though the “divide and conquer” has worked well so far. But the Muslims will learn their stupid lesson of hothead in-fighting. They will have to liberate their women just like the White European Christians were forced to let their women be free to be stronger. The Muslims will be modernized in thought and action. Once the Muslims recognized their stupidity, learned their hard lesson and start to be good in good terms with the world,  the Khazan Jews will be kicked out of Middle East in no time. The tiny colony of Khazan Jews in fact is just a bunch of parasites who have lived and thrived  on the back of the USA and Europeans.

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Nov 17, 2017 10:59 AM

Israeli Prime Minister After Six-Day War: ‘We’ll Deprive Gaza of Water, and the Arabs Will Leave’

Declassified minutes of security cabinet sessions in the months after the Six-Day War show government ministers who were at a loss to deal with its implications

Then-Prime Minister Levi Eshkol and Defense Minister Moshe Dayan onboard a helicopter while touring army installations in the West Bank, September 1967.
Then-Prime Minister Levi Eshkol and Defense Minister Moshe Dayan onboard a helicopter while touring army installations in the West Bank, September 1967. Ilan Bruner/GPO

Minutes of last general staff meeting before 1967 war: ‘Egypt worried Israel close to nuclear bomb’
Israeli cabinet minutes from Six-Day War: From fear to euphoria to arrogance
Revealed from archive: Israel’s secret plan to resettle Arab refugees

“Empty” the Gaza Strip, “thin out” the Galilee, rewrite textbooks and censor political cartoons in Haaretz: These are among the proposals discussed by cabinet ministers after the Six-Day War that will be available to the public in a major release of declassified government documents by the Israel State Archives on Thursday.

The material being posted on the state archives’ website includes hundreds of pages of minutes from meetings of the security cabinet between August and December 1967. From reading them, it is clear that in the several months that followed the June 1967 war, members of the security cabinet were perplexed, confused and sometimes helpless in the face of the new challenges to the state.

Israel conquered East Jerusalem, the West Bank, the Gaza Strip, the Golan Heights and the Sinai Peninsula in under a week. It was not even remotely prepared for this scenario, and had to hit the ground running.

In December 1967, six months after the war, then-Prime Minister Levi Eshkol speculated over how to deal with the hundreds of thousands of Arabs newly under the state’s control. “At some point we will have to decide. There are 600,000 Arabs in these territories now. What will be the status of these 600,000 Arabs?” he asked.

Eshkol evidently felt no urgency in regard to the matter. “I suggest that we don’t come to a vote or a decision today; there’s time to deal with this joy, or better put, there’s time to deal with this trouble,” he said. “But for the record I’m prepared to say this: There’s no reason for the government to determine its position on the future of the West Bank right now. We’ve been through three wars in 20 years; we can go another 20 years without a decision.”
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He got backing from Transportation Minister Moshe Carmel, who said, “If we sit 20 years, the world will get used to our being in those territories, in any case no less than they got used to [Jordan’s King] Hussein being there. We have more rights; we are more identified with these territories than he is.”

But an examination of other documents shows Eshkol was well aware Israel couldn’t ignore the problems posed by the occupation for long, particularly its rule over hundreds of thousands of Arabs. In one discussion he compared Israel to “a giraffe’s neck,” because it was so narrow. “The strip of this country is like a miserable, threatening neck for us, literally stretched out for slaughter,” he said. “I cannot imagine it – how we will organize life in this country when we have 1.4 million Arabs and we are 2.4 million, with 400,000 Arabs already in the country?”

One of the “solutions” to the new situation, according to Eshkol, was to encourage Arabs to emigrate. In this context, Eshkol told ministers he was “working on the establishment of a unit or office that will engage in encouraging Arab emigration.”

He added, “We should deal with this issue quietly, calmly and covertly, and we should work on finding a way for them to emigrate to other countries and not just over the Jordan [River].”

Eshkol expressed the hope that, “precisely because of the suffocation and imprisonment there, maybe the Arabs will move from the Gaza Strip,” adding there were ways to remove those who remained. “Perhaps if we don’t give them enough water they won’t have a choice, because the orchards will yellow and wither,” he said in this context. Another “solution,” he said, could be another war. “Perhaps we can expect another war and then this problem will be solved. But that’s a type of ‘luxury,’ an unexpected solution.”

“We are interested in emptying out Gaza first,” Eshkol summed up. To which Labor Minister Yigal Allon suggested “thinning the Galilee of Arabs,” while Religious Affairs Minister Zerah Warhaftig said, “We must increase [the number of] Jews and take all possible measures to reduce the number of Arabs.”

One idea raised by Defense Minister Moshe Dayan was to give the Arabs of the West Bank and Gaza permits to work abroad, in the hope that some would prefer to stay there. “By allowing these Arabs to seek and find work in foreign countries, there’s a greater chance they’ll want to migrate to those countries later,” Dayan said.

As for Gaza, Dayan was pretty optimistic. According to his calculations, of the 400,000 people who then lived in Gaza, only 100,000 would remain. The rest, whom he termed refugees, “must be removed from there under any arrangement that’s made.” Among his ideas was to resettle the Gazans in eastern Jordan.

Nor was Dayan particularly worried about Israeli military rule in the West Bank. “No soldier will have any interest in interfering in the lives of the inhabitants. I have no interest in the army sitting precisely in Nablus. It can sit on a hill outside Nablus.”

Justice Minister Yaakov Shimshon Shapira took the opposite position, calling for Israel to withdraw from the territories and warning that Israel couldn’t exist as a Jewish state if it retained them. “We won’t be able to maintain the army, when there will such a large percentage of residents who [won’t serve] in the army. There won’t be a[n army] command without Arabs and certainly there won’t be a government or a Knesset Foreign Affairs and Defense Committee without Arabs when they’re 40 percent,” he said.
Prime Minister Levi Eshkol and Defense Minister Moshe Dayan during their visit to army installations on the West Bank, September 20, 1967.
Prime Minister Levi Eshkol and Defense Minister Moshe Dayan during their visit to army installations on the West Bank, September 20, 1967.Ilan Bronner, GPO

Finance Minister Pinhas Sapir said that remaining in the territories would be “a disaster for the State of Israel,” which would become an Arab state. He warned that there was nothing to stop the West Bank from suddenly declaring independence, and that it was only a matter of time.

Education Minister Zalman Aranne felt similarly. “I do not for one minute accept the idea that the world outside will look at the fact we’re taking everything for ourselves and say, ‘Bon Appetit,’” he said. “After all, in another year or half a year the world will wake up; there’s a world out there and it will ask questions.”

Aranne objected to the argument, put forth by Dayan and others, that Israel must retain the territories for security reasons. “Suddenly, after all these victories, there’s no survival without these territories? Without all those things we never dreamed of before the six days of this war, like Jerusalem?” he asked.

Arab rights didn’t seem to be much of a concern for Aranne; he was more worried about the future of the Jewish state.

“The way I know the Jewish people in Israel and the Diaspora, after all the heroism, miracles and wonders, a Jewish state in which there are 40 percent Arabs is not a Jewish state. It is a fifth column that will destroy the Jewish state. It will be the kiss of death after a generation or a generation and a half,” he warned.

“I see the 2 million Jews before me differently when there will be 1.3 million Arabs – 1.3 million Arabs, with their high birth rate and their permanent pent-up hatred. … We can overcome 60,000 Arabs, but not 600,000 and not a million,” Aranne concluded.

Within the inconclusive discussions of the future of the territories are the seeds of talk of establishing settlements, outposts and army bases. The minutes show that even half a year after the war, the government had not formulated an orderly policy on this issue, but discussed various ideas even as it chose to delay making these tough decisions as well.

So it was, for example, in the case of Hebron, when there were requests to renew the Jewish presence in the city. Eshkol showed the ministers a letter he received in November 1967 from associates of the dean of Hebron Yeshiva – which relocated to Jerusalem after the 1929 Hebron Massacre – asking the government to “make appropriate arrangements to let dozens of the yeshiva’s students, teachers and supervisors return and set up a branch in Hebron.”

Allon was all for it. “There is a benefit in finding the first nucleus of people willing to settle there. The desire of these yeshiva students is a great thing. There aren’t always candidates willing to go to such a difficult place.” No decision on the matter was made at that time, though.

There were also cabinet members who spoke of preparing for the next war. The minutes included pessimistic reports about the number of warplanes left to Israel after the war. It was argued that the Arab states had already acquired new planes and had more than Israel.

Ezer Weizman, deputy IDF chief of staff at the time, detailed the difficulty of trying to extract promises of military aid from Washington.

“Is there no hope of getting planes from any other country?” asked Interior Minister Haim-Moshe Shapira. Weizman replied, “We checked in Sweden. Sweden isn’t prepared to talk about this. England has nothing to buy. I don’t think Australia will give us anything.”

Belgium was mentioned as a possibility: It was claimed that Brussels had offered to help Jerusalem circumvent the French embargo by procuring French planes and even German tanks for Israel.

Dayan warned, “The impression, as of now, is that not only are the Arabs not rushing to make peace, they are slowly starting to think again about war.” It was six years before the Yom Kippur War.

Ofer Aderet

Haaretz Correspondent

read more: https://www.haaretz.com/israel-news/.premium-1.823075

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Strategy to ‘suffocate’ Gaza strip revealed in Israeli govt docs from Six Day War

Strategy to ‘suffocate’ Gaza strip revealed in Israeli govt docs from Six Day War
Israel has released declassified documents from after the Six Day War which reveal the government’s plans to starve Gaza and its controversial plans to deal with the Palestinians.

The declassified documents were released on the Israel State Archives on Thursday and include hundreds of pages of minutes from cabinet meetings between August and December 1967, soon after the Six Day War ended the previous June.

The Six Day War between Israel and its Arab neighbors ended with Israel capturing East Jerusalem and the West Bank from Jordan, the Gaza strip and Sinai Peninsula from Egypt, and the Golan Heights from Syria.

The documents provide insight into the Israeli government’s strategy for dealing with the Palestinian people and show it was unprepared for the aftermath of its victory. Some of the revelations are jarring in light of the current standoff in Israeli-Palestinian relations, from the continued stalling on a two-state solution to ongoing settlement expansion and the almost “unlivable” situation in Gaza, the documents provide numerous premonitions for what was to come.

HOW TO DEAL WITH THE ARABS?

“There are 600,000 Arabs in these territories now. What will be the status of these 600,000 Arabs?” Prime Minister Levi Eshkol said in December 1967, Haaretz reports. “I suggest that we don’t come to a vote or a decision today; there’s time to deal with this joy, or better put, there’s time to deal with this trouble.”

READ MORE: UN panel blasts Israel over abuses and settlement expansion in Occupied Palestinian Territories

“There’s no reason for the government to determine its position on the future of the West Bank right now. We’ve been through three wars in 20 years; we can go another 20 years without a decision,” he said.

“If we sit 20 years, the world will get used to our being in those territories, in any case no less than they got used to [Jordan’s King] Hussein being there,” Transportation Minister Moshe Carmel suggested. “We have more rights; we are more identified with these territories than he is.”

GAZA’S “SUFFOCATION AND IMPRISONMENT”

A UN envoy and former UK Prime Minister David Cameron are among those who have compared Gaza to an open-air prison, but it appears that the Israeli government has long intended for that to be the case. “Precisely because of the suffocation and imprisonment there, maybe the Arabs will move from the Gaza Strip,” Eshkol said, Mondoweiss reports.

“Perhaps if we don’t give them enough water they won’t have a choice, because the orchards will yellow and wither,” he added, in a suggestion that appears to fit the UN definition of genocide, which includes “deliberately inflicting on the group conditions of life calculated to bring about its physical destruction in whole or in part.”

The UN has warned that by 2020 Gaza will be “unlivable,” suggesting the strategy introduced by the Israeli government during the 1960s may soon come to fruition.

“We are interested in emptying out Gaza first,” Eshkol said when his defence minister suggested giving Arabs foreign work permits to entice them to stay away.

JEWS ONLY?

“A Jewish state in which there are 40 percent Arabs is not a Jewish state. It is a fifth column that will destroy the Jewish state,” Education Minister Zalman Aranne said in cabinet minutes. “It will be the kiss of death after a generation or a generation and a half.”

Israel was like “a giraffe’s neck” Eshkol said, because it was so narrow. “The country is like a miserable, threatening neck for us, literally stretched out for slaughter,” he said of Israel’s perceived vulnerability.

“I cannot imagine it – how we will organize life in this country when we have 1.4 million Arabs and we are 2.4 million, with 400,000 Arabs already in the country?” Eshkol said.

“We must increase [the number of] Jews and take all possible measures to reduce the number of Arabs,” Religious Affairs Minister Zerah Warhaftig said.

Labor Minister Yigal Allon suggested “thinning the Galilee of Arabs,” referring to Arab Israelis living in the northern region Israel won in 1948 Arab-Israeli war.

HEBRON – A SETTLEMENT EXPERIMENT

The dean of the Hebron Yeshiva, an institution dedicated to the study of religious texts, requested its students and teachers return to and set up a branch in Hebron in November 1967, Eshkol told his cabinet. The school had moved to Jerusalem in 1929, after the Hebron Massacre that saw more than 60 Jews killed.

“There is a benefit in finding the first nucleus of people willing to settle there,” Allon said. “The desire of these yeshiva students is a great thing. There aren’t always candidates willing to go to such a difficult place.”

Today, more than 1,000 Israeli settlers live in the Palestinian city of Hebron. In October 2017, Israel approved the first new settlements to be built there in 15 years.

THE LUXURY OF WAR

Justice Minister Yaakov Shimshon Shapira, Finance Minister Pinhas Sapir and Education Minister Zalman Aranne voiced their concerns as to how the outside world would view their actions, even calling for Israel to withdraw from the territories.

“I do not for one minute accept the idea that the world outside will look at the fact that we’re taking everything for ourselves and will say, ‘Bon Appetit,’ ” Aranne said. “After all in another year or half a year the world will wake up; there’s a world out there and it will ask questions.”

Another “solution” touted by the Israeli PM was to hope for war. “Perhaps we can expect another war and then this problem will be solved,” he said. “But that’s a type of ‘luxury,’ an unexpected solution.”

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The Yinon Plan and the Role of the ISIS

This incisive article was first published in July 2014 (emphasis added by GR)

LIVE messages and pictures of Sunni ISIS fighters dressed in Islamic attire circulated through social media network such as You Tube ostensibly authenticate the hostile agenda of the ISIS fighters to dismember Iraq by carving out a Sunni Islamic Caliphate stretching from Syria to the western Sunni heartlands in Anbar Province in Iraq. The usage of the state seal of the Prophet Muhammad (SAW) on the ISIS flag as well for its Coat of Arms seemingly validates that ISIS are Sunni fighters.

The rapid march of the ISIS towards Baghdad and its swift takeover of Mosul and Tikrit, and Baiji oil refinery, Fallujah and Ramadi in the Anbar Province, and seizure of border crossings into Syria and Jordan are presented by political analysts as a “civil war” fought along sectarian lines, Sunni Arabs versus Shiia Arabs. Added to this is the ethnically different Iraqi Kurds who have enjoyed semi-independence under the US patronage and are now on the verge of declaring complete independence from Baghdad.

Through the powerful lenses of the Western media houses, the global village watch with horror and agony the unfolding blitzkrieg in Iraq carried out by ISIS fighters calling for the creation of the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria also referred to as the Islamic State of Iraq and al-Sham (the Levant). The picture thus being unfolded to the world is that Iraq is on the verge of being divided into three small states: Sunni Iraq, Shiia Iraq and an independent Kurdistan.

Similar to the deceptive US-UK call for the invasion of Iraq on grounds of Iraq possessing weapons of mass destruction, western media reporters are now engaged in misleading and deceiving global public opinion as to the real perpetrators of this ISIS project. Like the western manufactured “Arab Spring” in North Africa, the ISIS project is a deception at its worst designed with hateful intentions to cause horrendous regional mayhem and destruction with military might for the creation of a “New Middle East” with Israel as the regional power in control of the region’s oil, gas and water resources.

The present ISIS lightning war in Iraq is the creation of an illusion to initiate the fulfillment of a pre-planned agenda of the West in close alliance with Israel to redraw the map of the entire region as the “New Middle East.” This is the Yinon Plan at work, which aims at the balkanisation of the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) Region into smaller and weaker entities or states in order to ensure the dominant position of Israel in the region and the control of its oil, gas and water resources by the US-Israel nexus. In the process of balkanisation, the facets of ethnicity, religion and race from within the region are engaged for destruction, causing alarm for the UN and international military intervention to “protect innocent civilians,” thus paving the way for the ultimate achievement of the designed goals of creating the “New Middle East.”

The chaos, destruction and devastation caused by the ISIS in its process of establishing the Sunni Islamic Caliphate in Iraqi and Syrian territories is the realisation of the intended policy of the US and the West to change public perception that the “War on Terror” was never a war waged by the West against Islam but a “war within Islam” along religious, ethnic and sectarian lines in the Islamic world. The Islamic State of Iraq and al-Sham’s Sunni Caliphate project coincides with a longstanding US agenda to carve up both Iraq and Syria into three separate territories: A Sunni Islamist Caliphate, an Arab Shiia Republic, and a Republic of Kurdistan.

The division of Iraq into three separate entities had also been strongly advocated by US Vice-President Joe Biden. Biden’s heritage and an analysis of his electoral constituents will help understand better his support for the fragmentation of Iraq under the Yinon Plan.

Iraq, which was not only the most mechanised and urbanised state in the Middle East, possessing the largest oil reserve in the Middle East (tapped and untapped), but also cohesively united as a state with diverse ethno-linguistics and sectarian groups was the biggest strategic challenge to the plotters of this balkanisation plan.

The destruction of Iraq began from within the region with Iran as the adversary. The eight-year war between Iraq and Iran left both the oil rich countries economically exhausted and militarily weak. In order to thwart the Khomeini Revolution, Iran, to the proponents of the Yinon Plan, became the logical choice from within the Middle East region to fight against Iraq. Although Iraq has been represented to the world as a Shiite-majority state, Sunni Iraqis form the majority since the Kurds in Iraq are also Sunnis. The existence of the two major ethno-linguistics groups, the Arabs and the Kurds and the two major sectarian groups within the Islamic faith, the Sunni and the Shiia in Iraq allowed the balkanisation planners to foment tensions leading to total disintegration of the social fabric of the Iraqi society since  the US-UK led invasion in 2003.

Prior to the invasion, Iraq enjoyed a 50-50 Shiia-Sunni marital alliance and the Kurds enjoyed autonomous power within the Iraqi state under President Saddam Hussein’s leadership. The no-fly zones imposed by the West in northern Kurd Iraq and southern Shiia-held regions between 1993 and 2003, following the first Gulf War solidified the lines of demarcation for the impending three divisions of Iraq to be finally carried out by the ISIS. The intentions of the US-Israel nexus for the implementation of the Yinon Plan was clear to Saddam’s regime before the impending US-UK led invasion of Iraq in 2003 as expressed by the former Prime Minister of Iraq, Tariq Aziz: “This is not regime change but regional change.”

The writer has taught at the University of the West Indies, Mona Campus, Jamaica.

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